Check out all the news at NMPL!

p08

Monthly Newsletter – February 2019

Letter from the Director
by Sally Tornow, Library Director

Anyone old enough to remember I Dream of Jeannie? I truly wish I could just cross my arms, bob my head, and make the modernization of the Library all done. However, any of you who have ever done any updating or renovating to your homes, know that NOTHING works that way. A major component to the project is the $1,000,000 state grant that the Library was awarded. Since two of our buildings are older than 50 years, the State Historic Preservation Office must approve our renovation plans before the process of receiving the state money can begin. And that IS a process: Once we have SHPO’s approval (hopefully within the next week or two), then we apply to add our project to the State Bond Commission’s agenda. We have been warned that it can take some time to get on the agenda, and the Commission doesn’t meet on a regular basis, so that might take some time, too. Even with all that, we are hoping to go out to bid late spring or early summer, move ourselves into our itty bitty quarters, and have construction begin summer or early fall.

Itty bitty quarters?! Yes, we all, but especially you, will have to endure some pain to make this beautiful building happen. During construction, the entire library will be housed in the original building and the bottom floor of the Goodman House. Our preliminary plan is for the Children’s Library to be in what is now the Picture Book Room; Adult fiction, dvd’s, new items and cdbooks will be in what is now the Children’s fiction/nonfiction area; Young Adult and Teen will remain in the hallway, but much consolidated; Adult nonfiction, public access computers, and some staff will be up in Memorial Hall. Other staff will be on the bottom floor of Goodman House. Programming will mostly take place offsite and small meeting room space will be at an even greater premium than it is now, although we are hoping to keep the Conference Room available for small meetings. A good portion of the collection will go into storage, but we will still be able to ask for items from other libraries and we will be making a greater effort to provide E resources (they take up no space!), so now is the time to learn how to use our ebooks if you haven’t already.

I’ve spoken to many librarians in the state who have experienced this process and every one of them said that it made their patrons value the Library more than they had, appreciate the finished product even more than they expected, and brought the community together as they ‘suffered’ together. I promise, it will be worth it!

E-book Searching Made Easier
by Sally Tornow, Library Director

I have been an avid e-book reader for years, due to the facts that I can prop up my iPad and just turn pages with one finger (no holding the book) and that I can read with the lights off – both hugely important to someone with arthritis in her hands and who can only read in bed at night. Yes, I miss print books for many reasons, but the reasons for giving them up are more important to me.

However, this is for those of you who DO like to read our e-books because we just discovered (and maybe you already knew this – librarians can be slow to know EVERYTHING!) an easier way to discover what we have AND to check them out. You all know that we offer Axis 360 e-books, RBDigital e-books and e-audios, and hoopla e-books, e-audios, movies, music, and comic books. Presumably, you have downloaded the apps for each on your device and set up your accounts. Did you know that if you are looking for a specific title, you can actually look in our regular catalog, see which service offers the book, and then CHECK IT OUT THROUGH THE CATALOG? You will still need to download it to your device, but you don’t have to do a search through each app to find out which service offers the item. The first time you will have to enter your account info when you check out, but if you check save login info, you won’t have to again.

p02

 

Search the catalog for a title, I used Bluebird, Bluebird.

p12

 

It comes up as both an Axis 360 book and an RBDigital book.

p11

 

I clicked on the top RBDigital link and it takes you to the next screen.

p05

 

And, voila! You can check it out! This can be done on a laptop, desktop, or your device through our catalog. After checking out the item, your device will automatically have it in the app (you may have to refresh) and you will just have to download it. This may seem like a lot of work, but it saves a lot of time if you are looking for a specific title – I find it very aggravating to have to open each app to do a search, so I’m hoping that this may make your library e-life a bit easier, too!

Winter Reading Program
by Val Fisher, Public Services Librarian

p13

Genealogy Buff?  New Records in Family Search
by Sally Tornow, Library Director

Family Search expanded its free online archives in November 2018 with almost 90 million new indexed family history records and almost 300,000 digital images from around the world. New historical records were added from Benin, Chile, Costa Rica, The Dominican Republic, England, Germany, Honduras, Ireland, Lesotho, Liberia, Nicaragua, Peru, and the United States, which includes California, Georgia, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Native American Enrollment Records, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, and Washington. New digital images were added from BillionGraves .

Find your ancestors using these free archives online, including birth, marriage, death, and church records. Millions of new genealogy records are added each month to make your search easier.”

At least one of these additions should provide you with new information!

p07

Ancestry.com
by Peggy Ganong, Library Technology Coordinator

Okay all you Genealogy buffs, have you been using Ancestry.com for your research? You just read about Family Search (available both in the library and remotely). Well, Ancestry.com also has many features that make it a powerful and comprehensive genealogy tool. See all that the database has to offer! It affords you access to search:

  • Census Records – Find ancestors in the complete set of U.S. Federal Census images from 1790-1940, including name indexes.
  • Vital Records – When did those significant life changing events happen in your ancestors’ life? Search the Vital Records to find out.
  • Military Records – Did your ancestors serve in the Military? The collection of military records holds the answers.
  • Immigration Records – When did your ancestors arrive in the U.S.? And how did they get here? Search the passenger lists and other immigration records to learn more.

What else besides searching does with Ancestry.com offer? Many options are available. There are links to Message Boards; a Learning Center with Research Aids (a variety of tips to get your research moving. Selecting one of the topics listed (Getting Started, Beyond the Basics, plus tips on how to use the census, military, immigration and ethnic sections of the database will enable you to narrow or expand your search) and Maps (understanding the state your ancestor lived in will help you better understand them); plus a variety of downloadable forms and charts to organize your results.

Now Ancestry.com is only available to access at the library, however check out this video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qcojv4CQdKE&feature=youtu.be and see how you can send your research home to you!

p10

Tech Programs

by  Rachael Wright, Digital Library Associate 

p06

 

p03

 

p04

Teen Programs
by  Rose Simpson, YA Librarian

Come join the fun with all your friends!Attend all the Teen Programs you always loved as well as some new and exciting ones for 2019.

p01

p09

Library H3lp

by Sally Tornow, Director


Keep an eye out for a trial run of a new service coming in February.  Most consumer websites have a chat button nowadays, so we are going to try it for 3 months to see if you like it and find it useful.  We’re not really sure how it will work at this point, so we can’t describe it in detail, but please let us know once it becomes live!

New Milford Public Library | 860-355-1191 | http://www.newmilfordlibrary.org

p15

p14